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Tag: escape pod

Short story: “On a Clear Day You Can See All the Way to Conspiracy”

“On a Clear Day You Can See All the Way to Conspiracy,” by Desmond Warzel

First appeared on SFReader April 15th, 2009, the winner of the SFReader 2008 Story Contest; featured in Escape Pod episode 284, March 17th, 2011, and later as a Flashback Friday piece in episode 634 June 28th, 2018

3,280 words

I can see why this would be considered a classic Escape Pod story. Escape Pod seems to define itself as fun more than anything else, even if it does embrace darker stuff sometimes.

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Short story: “Lonely Robot on a Rocket Ship in Space”

“Lonely Robot on a Rocket Ship in Space,” by A. Merc Rustad

Appeared in Cicada Magazine in 2016; read by Christopher Cornell for Escape Pod 615 (see the text for visuals like emoticons and Byron’s typed-out messages)

4,299 words

A sweet story, if rather predictable. Judging from the Escape Pod forum discussion, transgender people really identify with it.

Short story: “Sparg”

“Sparg,” by Brian Trent

Appeared in Daily Science Fiction in 2013; read by Alasdair Stuart for Escape Pod 614, February 8th, 2018

2,010 words, pretty close to my guess

Oh no.

What a good dog cephalopod critter.

Short story: “A Study in Symmetry, or the Chance Encounter of an Android and a Painter”

“A Study in Symmetry, or the Chance Encounter of an Android and a Painter,” by Jamie Lackey

Read by Trendane Sparks and Divya Breed for Escape Pod 619, March 15th, 2018, as part of Artemis Rising 4

4,314 words

Cute.

Short story: “Surveillance Fatigue”

“Surveillance Fatigue,” by Jennifer R. Donohue

Read by Diane Severson Mori for Escape Pod 623, April 12th, 2018

2,273 words

Troublingly believable. Great last line.

Short story: “Mother Tongues”

“Mother Tongues,” by S. Qiouyi Lu

Appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction, January/February 2018, Vol. 42 Nos. 1 & 2 (Whole numbers 504 & 505)—update: now featured in Escape Pod 636

Maybe 2,000 words? Very short Actually over 3,610 words—I didn’t know how to count the Chinese words

My favorite piece in this issue so far. A very simple story, but effective.

Short story: “Uncanny”

“Uncanny,” by James Patrick Kelly

Appeared in Asimov’s, October/November 2014, Vol. 38, Nos. 10–11 (Whole Nos. 465–466), edited by Sheila Williams; read by Dani Cutler in episode 489 of Escape Pod, April 8th, 2015

1,421 words

Pretty funny, though a bit generic as sexbot stories go.

Short story: “Everyone Will Want One”

“Everyone Will Want One,” by Kelly Sandoval

Appeared in Asimov’s #464, September 2014, edited by Sheila Williams; read by Erin Bardua for episode 498 of Escape Pod, July 6th, 2015

5,837 words

(Spoilers.) An interesting artificial intelligence story, as well as a subtle, economical high school drama. (Or are they in middle school?) I like the note of hope at the end.

Short story: “Rocket Surgery”

“Rocket Surgery,” by Effie Seiberg

First appeared in Analog in 2016; featured in episode 588 of Escape Pod

3,330 words

A charmingly optimistic story of artificial intelligence. Well, optimistic about technology, anyway—General Pitticks doesn’t sound like a great candidate for the presidency to me.

Short story: “What Glistens Back”

“What Glistens Back,” by Sunny Moraine

Appeared in Lightspeed Magazine, November 2014 (Issue 54); featured in episode 599 of Escape Pod

3463 words by Lightspeed‘s count

An excellent story. Good ending.

I somehow knew Eric was Sean’s partner from the start, just from his reactions. Some of that may be down to the podcast narrator’s acting (that’s Trendane Sparks).

Reminds me of another (famous) story where multiple astronauts are dispersed into space and can communicate with each other only by radio—wish I could remember who wrote it. Also brings to mind “Now Dress Me in My Finest Suit and Lay Me in My Casket.”

Interesting that the author uses “they/them” pronouns. Naturally, Escape Pod respects that.

This second-person story is slightly unusual in that it uses the imperative mood only occasionally. “Laugh[,]” it instructs.